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Confidence

May 18th, 2017

Confidence

This is for all the young folks out there that haven't learned to develop enough "confidence" to accomplish the goals in life they want. I was recently asked along with my other classmates to write what I was most proud of accomplishing after I graduated. This got me thinking about an article I wrote sometime back, about confidence. I've got some classmates that have put me to shame, like the Retired Chief Of Police of a city, or another guy that was able to build a home of such substance it was used as a Model for " Better Homes and Gardens" or a gal that not only owns a great home here in Ohio, but another one in Sedona Arizona I could go on and on. How do they do it? I keep seeing post after post here on Facebook from our young friends that obviously lack confidence and I though, I was like that at one time how did I overcome the most shy and backward kid in school. Read the story and see and maybe it will change your life like it did mine, it enabled me to earn enough money in 9 months to pay for a brand new 1966 Mustang.

CONFIDENCE
WHAT IS IT: The dictionary says its belief in one's own abilities? Trust; reliance; assurance:
WHY DO YOU WANT IT: Let me answer that by telling a short story about myself? When I was a young man in high school going through my senior year, I was very shy, almost backwards and had no confidence in my abilities in social graces.
I knew who I wanted to ask to the senior prom and probably everyone else in school who knew me knew also who I would ask. But I didn't have the confidence to ask her, even though I sat right beside her in study hall every day. I was just simply to shy and scared to try.
I didn't want to call her on the phone from home for fear my brothers and sisters might laugh and tease me, if by chance I got turned down. So what could I do, well I decided to walk about a mile down the road to Elmer's Grocery Store and call her from there, because I could have some privacy as I would pick a time when no one was about. I had no confidence at all in myself and I almost blew it, because she told me she wasn't going to wait any longer for fear of having to turn down any other callers and have no one ask her and if I hadn't called by now I probably wasn't going too. Well everything turned out well and I took "Miss Fireman of Ohio" to the senior prom and we all had a great time.
HOW DO YOU GET IT: Confidence comes mostly from doing something and doing it well enough to know you're good at it? Back to when I was in school I had good confidence in my ability to play basketball. You see as a teenager I could do something most could not do.
I milked 6 cows every morning and again at night which gave me very strong hands and fingers. I could walk out on the gym floor holding a basketball upside down in each hand and this gave me the confidence I needed to try hard enough to make the team.
I wasn't arrogant; I was just self-assured and knew I could play well, after all my dad played well in Kentucky and could still out shoot me in the barn lot. Plus I have some cousins who played at Lynchburg that I learned from, Johnny who was really good ended up playing for the United States Air Force team and played all over the world and at Madison Square Garden's many times. He had articles written about him in the New York Times calling him "sure shot Branham with springs in his feet"; Johnny could jump like a Deer. I was 5' 10" tall and he would run straight at me and jump completely over my head. His older brother Jimmy played along with our coach John Burton there in Lynchburg and Coach Burton held the school record for highest score until it was won by Danny Branham little brother to Jimmy and Johnny. Danny obviously learned from his older brothers.
Confidence is so important and if you'll watch closely when you see a great athlete that has a son or daughter that comes along they develop that trust and confidence from their father that helps them excel beyond the normal very quickly. It's the trust and assurance they are able to gain that gives them the boost they need.
When I entered the USAF and was sent to March AFB in Southern California, where I was just another rock in the creek, I lost all confidence among the many that talked with arrogance like Rush Limbaugh or Bobby Knight does today, with all the confidence in the world, not knowing they were just as scared as me.
Things went along like this for quite some time until one day I met Marty Bloomingdale and in talking with him I heard him tell Jim Garret the amount of money he was making in his off hours. As I was only making $123.00 per month with a wife and kid I was interested in making a little more money. Let me just say that Marty was not an impressive individual he was not good looking and he was not someone most would want to emulate. So I figured if he could do it so could I. So I went with him to meet this Chuck Courtwright who was the leader of this group called "Presto Pride".
Well Chuck changed my life forever he instilled in me the confidence and enthusiasm that was always there just waiting to come out and be displayed. He asked me a few questions and said, come back next week and in between now and then I want you to read this book and handed me a book called [Think and Grow Rich]. He knew if I was really interested in improving my life I would read the book and return wanting to know more and if I was just another blow hard I probably wouldn't even come back.
Well I read the book and was as thrilled and excited as one can be, I had never heard of such successes as was in this book and all starting from nothing. I was ready to get to work, but he wasn't ready for me just yet, he handed me another book called [How to Win Friends and Influence People] by Dale Carnegie. I had to wait another week before he would hire me, he said I don't want you to get started and then fail, I want you to know you can do this and continue to be successful from here on out.
I didn't doubt him at all I could see success all around him at every meeting he was giving away prizes that I couldn't afford at all, dozens of them fancy lamps and what knots for the home, fancy clocks made of glass, stuff you would only dream about as a young 21 year old Airman.
Just let me say I went to work with him and in nine months earned enough money to completely pay off a brand new 1966 Mustang. We almost completely furnished our home with his prizes, you see he knew he had to not only have me, but he needed to have my wife's confidence as well hence all the prizes to motivate her to spur me on and help build my confidence. I parlayed all that success into enough confidence to come back to Ohio and had all three company's that I had given my resume too wanting to hire me, and yet with no formal education [college degrees were a requirement] I was hired as a salesman for PITNEY BOWES, the world's leader in mail equipment.
I went on to own Century 21 Champions Real Estate Company with 155 sales people and seven offices plus a commercial division in Cincinnati. A large building company an Insurance company and a development company selling my land to Fifth Third Bank , Arby's and United Dairy Farmers and others . I even wrote a National book on " Mergers in the Real Estate Business". So if this ole country boy can do it so can you. Hope you don't take this as bragging, but why should you believe me if I had never accomplished anything, I'm just trying to set my posture as they say lol.
Confidence is like pouring water into a glass; if you try to do to tepidly you will most likely spill some of it just trying ; if you're so arrogant you just grab it and dump it in you'll lose most of it also; but if you pour with assurance, trust, and confidence you will fill the glass and never spill a drop. Learn all you can about what you want to do, find something you desire, go after it with a passion. Keep your priorities straight, I always put GOD first family second and my vocation third and anything else after that for fun.
Remember your ABC'S when it comes to success I had a complete "wagon wheel of success" I used to teach my sales associates it works and some drove new Cadillac's free to prove it.
ATTITUDE
BELIEF
CONFIDENCE
Uncle Ran
 

Country Boy And The Big City

March 18th, 2017

Country Boy And The Big City

I suppose folks perceive big city's different depending on where you come from and how you're introduced to them and of course your age and lots of other things to numerous to mention. Photography Prints
As a kid out on the farm way out in Highland County Ohio, Cincinnati seamed a big city far off where only a few of the rich folks and older people would sometimes go to for special reasons or to work.
It's funny now how we look at things from a different perspective based on our own circumstances, let me give you an example.
One of my best friends and neighbors growing up was Butch Peelle, we would ride our bikes around the county, play basketball in his barn loft until our fingers were about to freeze and eat all the tomatoes out of everyone's garden and always had a big time . They had more comic books behind their couch than I had ever seen in my whole life and that helped me to want to read, I always like going up there just to read the comics..
One day Mr. Peelle took Butch and I down to see the Reds play at Crosley Field. I thought I was in heaven, he bought us hot dogs, popcorn and drinks and we had a grand ole time, but I learned a valuable lesson.
I was lucky enough to catch a fly ball and was thrilled to pieces and was just standing there admiring the ball and this little street wise kid came running up and said man what a catch can I see the ball, of course this ole country boy not knowing what to expect , I just handed him the ball and he was gone before I could take a step to leave where I was standing. Guess I didn't realize you have to think fast and you just don't catch fly balls on every trip to the Red's game.
Hubert was a kind and generous man and he told us not to worry that on the way home we would stop in Hillsboro at Pasquale's for a Pizza Pie. Well here we go, being raised on the farm and not going to big towns much like Hillsboro let alone Cincinnati, except when it was my turn out of 8 kids to follow along with Mom to go grocery shopping, we always did our grocery shopping on Saturdays.
I wasn't considered a food connoisseur that's for sure and when Mr. Peelle said we would get a Pizza Pie I thought he was saying a piece of pie. So I wasn't expecting an Italian dish served like a pie with all kinds meat and stuff on top and cooked on a pie crust. I want to say I can only remember getting that sick one other time and that was when my big brother Dane talked me into swallowing tobacco juice from my chew to prove I was old enough to be able to chew, whewuuu. Mr. Peelle didn't laugh to much, but he sure had an infectious big smile and I've always remembered what a great day he gave us in the big city.
My next encounter with the big town didn't turn out much better. You see I had worked hard all summer long going into my senior year, because I knew if I was going to get a car to drive to school or any where else I would have to buy it myself. Well my Dad said when you get your money to together let me know and I'll take you down town Cincinnati where we can find a better car cheaper.
Of course I didn't take into consideration that my Dad had a different idea for a car that I did. He wanted me to buy a six cylinder that got good gas mileage and I wanted a hot Rod, guess who won that argument of course you got to remember gas was 23cents per gallon and he had to drive to Cincinnati everyday to work, so we settled on a 1953 six cylinder Studebaker. It was blue and looked like an air plane ready to take off.
Well everything was fine and I paid for the car and we headed out of town of course I didn't get to drive my new car. Mom wanted to drive until we got out of town and off of that big highway called Columbia Parkway "Rt 50". Well we stopped to filler up with gas and checked the oil and washed the windshield again and headed out with Dad following us. As Mom picked up speed " she always was a fast driver " all of a sudden the hood flipped up and back on top of the car so hard it beat the roof down on top of our heads. Mom had to stick her head out the window to see and asked me to watch the other side and make sure we didn't hit anything. Well we finally made it home but the hood was ruined. We made it into one of the best sleds you ever rode on in the winter snow. We could get several kids in it all at the same time.
I looked around at the junk yard for another hood and found one, where the body was ruined in a wreck, but the hood was great and it had a big V8. I bought it right on the spot and towed it down to Johnny Skaggs, my cousins farm in Lynchburg, because his dad Uncle Benny had a big barn with a beam where we could pull the motor and put it in my other car so I took two cars and made one good one. My other cousin Butch helped me do all the mechanics and we soon had it running good. After that I took it to Dayton and had all white leather seats installed, plush blue carpeting and had 7 coats of metallic blue paint put on her she was a beauty still to this day I think that was the best paint job I have ever seen on a car. You see what made that car so special to me was the summer of my senior year I went to work for one of dad's big construction companys who he worked for in Cincinnati. This guy was a millionaire and owned 1000 acres out by Clarksville and told my dad he was looking for help on his farm and I could work all the hours I wanted to work. Well let me tell you I was not afraid of work and the motivation to work for $1.00 per hour from 7am every morning until 11 or 12 pm every night sounded right up my alley. You see I was usually working for all the farmers around for 4 or 5 maybe 6 hours a day bailing hay which was hit and miss and never any thing steady. Well let me tell you we worked so many hours that first week the foreman almost got in a fight with Mr Brielmeyer, because the foreman's son Dave and I worked so many hours he wouldn't believe it. Well he paid us and said keep on working and we did ,we worked the entire summer seven days a week only taking one day off. I took my girl to the movies and promptly fell asleep at midnight and she work me up at 1PM and said you better take me home now. That's how I bought my 1953 Studebaker and all the money I put into it, but it was worth it, I saw one on my old neighbors and school buddies at our school Alumni and he even mentioned my car,but I had already graduated and didn't get to drive it to school.

One night when I wasn't going anywhere { probably broke} dad came in and asked if he could borrow my car. Mom had gone somewhere in our new 1957 Packard, man what a car it even had a turbo charger , and when you hit the gas pedal at sixty it would set you back in your seat with no uncertainty, this in my opinion was the prettiest car Dad ever bought it was maroon and white and looked as long as a train.
Well when Dad asked to borrow my car I didn't think to ask what he was going to do ,after all how could I turn him down, I had borrowed his car many nights. When I got in my car the next morning of course he had all ready left for work really early, he had to drive from our Leesburg farm to down town Cincinnati that was a very time consuming ride back then.
Of course ,that was before I helped build the freeways and bridges around I- 275, Another story later.

Dad had borrowed my car to go pick up his buddys and their coon hounds and hauled them all in my car which I kept immaculate, it should be known that blue carpet and mud don't mix , man was I upset, I was never able to get that yellow clay out of the carpet, guess they didn't have good cleaners back then.
I was asked the other day by my daughter my grandson how to buy a car, and that reminded me of when I purchased my first car. Not the Studebaker I worked so hard for.
So I had to tell him the story about my first car purchase it involved dad and a trip to downtown Cincinnati to all the used car lots.
.As a kid on the farm you quickly learn all kinds of mechanic things ,how to fix things and mend things, "you know how to hold everything together with bailing wire kind of stuff " and as a kid you think you know it all right. Wrong... My first car was
a 1951 Chrysler Hydramatic ,black as coal and heavy as a train. I lived 4 miles out of Leesburg and it took me one quart of oil and one gallon of gas to get there and back. It was ugly slow and not the kind of look I was wanting ,but not being able to afford a 1957 Chevy it was a set of wheels. But it lasted until I saved and worked enough to get my dream car which I would give anything just to have a picture of now .

Talking about big cities I remember one of the biggest laughs we all had one time down at my Grandpa's in Kentucky, first let me set the stage as they say, Grandpa and Grandma Branham lived up a holler, I mean a long branch holler a couple of miles long and dirt road no gravel. Many was the time if it was raining we would get stuck and have to walk the rest of the way always in the middle of the night, because we always left after dark when dad got home from work and back in the fifty's there wasn't any freeways and of course my grandpa didn't have a telephone he didn't even have electricity and no indoor plumbing it was uuuuuppp the holler.
Well this particular weekend my Aunt Hermel and Joaquin Vega and a bunch of my cousins were in as they used to say. Well Arby, Adrian, Darlene and Dale my cousins were brought up in East Chicago a very big city they new nothing about country life and were seldom able to get all the way down to Kentucky for a visit. Granny had one of those big long tables that would seat 12 folks with ladder back chairs and her cooking kitchen was off the dining room with one of those big old two story stoves that burned wood or coal. They had a small porch off to the left of the cooking room with a well for her to draw water from as needed. The main rooms of the house were heated with a fireplace, but the kids room as it was called didn't have any heat at all so we didn't relish going down in the winter to visit to say the least. Well Granny as usual would cook up the biggest dinners you ever saw I mean on Sunday it was always fried chicken and every kind of vegetable you could grow in a garden and believe me she had a garden. Well we were well along into the meal when Dale { about 7 or 8 at the time } said to Granny can I have some more " beans of my stick" and it suddenly it got very quiet and then everybody started laughing at once, of course he wanted more " corn on the cob" . We had a good laugh and went right back to eating, it just goes to show we are all products of our environment. Everybody has their own perspective and way of looking at things.


Uncle Ran

Toys on the Farm

January 21st, 2017

As a little kid on the farm, back in the late forty's and early fifty's we didn't have many toys to play with so we had to make do with what was to be had on hand.
Spam cans come to mind and tomato soup cans and such. When they plowed the fields the rows of upturned dirt made great places to take a spam can as a shovel and gouge out a road for the span can car to run and slide up and down the dirt to make a little road that would run up and down the furrowed hills and valleys.
After my brother and I got tired of digging highways and pushing the can around we would take a tomato soup can and split it up the middle, after cutting out the bottom and open it up good and wide to hold the hoop. Then find an old barrel hoop and tobacco stick and nail the can onto the end of the tobacco stick to make a holder for the hoop and stick to roll the hoop all around the barn lot.
This of course was before I got my first Daisy Red Ryder BB gun which occupied all my interest for quite some time, well actually until I got my first horse, when that came about me and Allen Page rode all over the county spending the night out on the trail just like they did in the movies..
Life on the farm was great, I wouldn't trade it for anything. What with the ole swimming hole , horses, hay mow's , tractors lots of fields and woods to hunt and fish and build tree houses, we once had a two story tree house , but that's another story.
Happy Trails for now Uncle Ran

LIFE ON THE FARM Rural General Stores

January 21st, 2017

LIFE ON THE FARM Rural General Stores

LIFE ON THE FARM Rural General Stores

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LIFE ON THE FARM Rural General Stores











December 22nd, 2013

Rural General stores served a purpose of more than just a place to pick up groceries.
This old store was very typical of the type that was located all over the Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana country side from 1800's on up to 1950's.
When I first saw the General Store at Bridges Ohio in highland County I was thrilled, it had glass counter front curved glass with shelves in behind the walk way that went all the way to the ceiling. They carried everything a kid or family could want and more.
We moved up to Bridges in the summer of 1952, I was riding on top of a load of our furniture on Grandpa's big red International flatbed truck, which would get you arrested today. At about 8 years old everything was new to me and very exciting; I just don't know how much use I was in lending a helping hand.
That's where I got my first Nesbitts Grape Soda, that along with the bologna sandwiches which tasted better than anything I had had yet.
Elmer Leaverton the owner was a kind and gentle old man and always happy to see you. He had a gas pump and sold kerosene and all types of groceries. As I grew up into my teen years and driving a car, gas was about 23 cents per gallon. I know because my first car was an old 51 Chrysler and it took one gallon of gas and one quart of oil to go into Leesburg and back, which was only 4 milesand until my graduation year I had to walk it every night coming home from basketball practice with games usually on Friday and Saturday nights.
All the farmers would gather at the store in the late fall and winter months after most of the work on the farms were finished. Elmer had an old pot belly stove and Dane my brother and I would sneak down to the store and sit around the stove and spit, trying to act big enough to get into the conversation. I always especially liked it at Christmas time; Elmer would buy candy in big amounts about 2' square boxes and sell it to everyone including Mom for Christmas in little brown Pokes, man that was the best candy you ever ate. She always bought 8 or 10 bags at a time so we really had a good variety. Elmers store was several miles out into the country, but back then there were little stores like this all over the country.
I guess thats why I like taking photos of them they all bring back fond memories of good times long gone, but as they say never forgotten. Sadly I don't have a picture of Elmer's store, sure wish I did.
Elmer had one of those high porches you had to climb to get into the store that were built a lot back in those days what with so many creeks close by flooding was a problem. Bridges was so named because you couldn't get to it without crossing a bridge, of which there were four at the time.
I'm sadly told the Columbus Dispatch came down to Elmers back in the 70's and did an interview on one of the last old fashioned stores still operating in Ohio , and a few weeks later some thugs came in and murdered Elmer and burned the store. The Leaverton family has a cemetery named after them just up the road, they were a large family and well respected in the community. I also remember my Grandpa's old store down in Kentucky, whenever we would go down to visit him and my pipe smoking jolly Grandma he would always bring me some stick bubble gum which was sweet as can be and you could bite off pieces to chew all day long. I would occasionally get to ride on Grandpa's Old mule called Big Jim and go to the store with him leaving before daylight and Mom and Dad would come by later in the car. It was always scary going thru the mountains in pitch dark ,we had to leave before daylight to get there in time to open the store.I never could figure out how that old mule and Grandpa could see well enough in the dark to go thru all that big woods and never get lost. Of course when you're a kid everything revolves around you, I never realized my other brothers and sisters probably got to do the same. There's one old store called Watson's we pass on route 11 between Maysville and Morehead that still to this day is still open after 50 years. Folks didn't make much money from these old stores ,but I guess it was a comfortable living. I know of several store owners in our family, including Mom and Dad who had a thriving store in Martinsville Ohio after Dad sold the farm up in Leesburg. This old store here depicted in the image is over in Indiana in a little town called Williamsburg on route 35 between Richmond and Muncie. I love all the old ads covering the wall of the store. the kid on the bicycle reminds me of times gone by that will never return but can't be forgotten. Just too many memories tied to stores, bicycles, bridges and barns.

The River Of Life

December 13th, 2015

The River Of Life

"The River of Life "

" Floating down a river is like going through life

you choose your own course, but cause your own strife."

The decisions we make in life our own choices and the priorities we place first are not always the best and that's what usually causes most of our problems. We have to learn from someone how to make good decisions and what priorities are the most important. Like not spending money we haven't even earned yet just so we can have what we think we want today and not wait until we have the money to pay for it.

"You can lay on your back and let the world carry you thru

or you can depend on yourself and you'll make it too."

Most truly successful people have a well rounded life, they have learned how to put their priorities in the proper order, GOD comes first , family next, their vocation follows ,but has to be attended to on a regular basis in order to take care of the first two.

"Maybe you're the type who's always on the run

you're to busy working to have any fun."

STEVE JOBS said just before he died There should be something that is more important: However, aside from work, I have little joy. In the end, wealth is only a fact of life that I am accustomed to.
At this moment, lying on the sick bed and recalling my whole life, I realize that all the recognition and wealth that I took so much pride in, have paled and become meaningless in the face of impending death.

In the darkness, I look at the green lights from the life supporting machines and hear the humming mechanical sounds, I can feel the breath of God and of death drawing closer…

Now I know, when we have accumulated sufficient wealth to last our lifetime, we should pursue other matters that are unrelated to wealth…
Should be something that is more important:

"Then there's the guy who paces everything right

when he reaches fast water he has plenty of fight."

"Whatever your goal whatever your course

just remember you set your own pace
so have no remorse."

Randy Branham © 1974

Who's influencing you, are you being subtly lead by others around you ? Do they want to keep you at shoulders length to make them look good, or do they want to inspire you to always do a bit better.
Back in the early seventy's I was down in a literal mud hole pounding nails into forms to hold concrete for footers for a large building we were building. After a bit I raised up and looked around me and standing next to me was what I considered an old man, he was probably no more that 58 or so, but at the ripe old age of maybe 25 he looked old to me. I thought to myself do I want to be doing what he's doing when I'm 58.
I don't think so.
But I was doing the exact same thing my two oldest brothers, my dad , my uncles, and everyone else I knew. We laughed about it and often said there's carpenters in the Branham family all the back to Jesus.
Sometimes we have to stick our heads up out of the box we find ourselves in and look out for ourselves. There's nothing wrong about being a carpenter or following someone Else's foot steps if that's what you want.
One year later after going to night school, I found myself in the Real Estate business. I sold 5 houses on my first day of floor time and was promptly told by my very distinguished broker the next day "you can't do that" that's never been done before, so I unknowingly complied and never did it again. Lesson learned, don't let others set your goals and dictate your life for you, step out of the box and do what YOU can do. Find something you can become passionate about that will allow you to earn the money you and yours need and learn to TITHE from the beginning, your Helper will show you the way, no matter how small your earnings are, remember you cannot out give God.


The Old Country Store

June 28th, 2015

The Old Country Store

Bridges Ohio Highland County, was just a little crossroads,but back in the 50/60's it was a real hub for our little community. We moved to bridges during the summer of 1951. We left a very nice 80 + acre farm down by Dodsonville /Pricetown area where Dad had built us a new home and a new barn. When we saw the farm there in Bridges we were astonished at all it had to offer.
There were two big barns one a bank barn,with spring fed running water year around, hog wallow, farm tank, water to both barns and even a 3 foot high 12 foot wide cattle tank, that we later converted into a gold fish tank where we kept gold fish that were 12 inches long, it sure was pretty.
The old house on the farm was 110 years old when we bought it and was listed on the historical landmarks in Washington DC, and when we tore it down some time later people came from there to take pictures and tried to get us to stop. The entire outside of the house was sided with walnut from the farm, with red cedar ceilings inside and lots of other woods with two big fireplaces. But is was cold and windy with breezes flowing in every direction, but very comfortable in the summer. We helped Dad build us a new concrete block 4 bedroom home that's still there today.
We met all our neighbors quickly, because we had the big swimming hole at the end of our farm where two creeks met. The mouth of the creek made a perfect place to go swimming and all the neighbor kids came down when ever they wanted to swim.
Elmer's General Store was just on up the road about 500 yards with all kinds of good things if you had the money.
I used to like to go down to Elmer's and hang around in the winter evenings and listen to the old men of the area talk about all kinds of things that were important at the time. We would sit around and put peanuts in our pop, thats what we called out drink back then it was either a soda pop or just pop.The old men would chew tobacco and spit in what ever was handy or have their own little can available.

LIFE ON THE Farm Chapter 3

March 11th, 2015

LIFE ON THE Farm Chapter 3

My most recent sale "Cattle on a Hill" reminds me of our farm when I was a kid. We would have to go bring in the cows for milking and feeding, which were always way up the creek and back on top of the hill where the most green grass would be. I remember pestering my big brother Dane to give me a chew of that [ Big Red Man Tobacco], well kids are not as smart as their big brothers. He knew when I would be running after the cows I would have to keep up and I would be chewing and swallowing the juice [to be a man you had to swallow the juice] .
Well let me say as a young kid it was a lesson on just how not to beg for what you can't handle yet or how sick one can get, when he turns as green as the grass. I made it all the way back down to the creek where I sat down on a big log and thats as far as I got. After they milked the cows and had supper and it was getting dark Dad sent him back up after me. He found me laying over a log surrounded by those big ole black and yellow Bumble Bees [another story]. Mom and Dad laughted about it and never said any more they already knew I had had enough, I've never had another chew in my mouth since.
Those big black and yellow bumble bees that had made a home in the log I was slumped over didn't bother me at all. I don't know but it might have been the smell of tobacco or maybe they just knew I wasn't going to hurt them . After all everyone knows animals can smell fear, and that was the farthest thing from my mind at the time. I It's a good thing thou that they don't have good memories.
Because we had a lot of fun trying to prove who was the bravest by fighting the bumble bees with a good strong horse weed , which we always had plenty of. Horse weeds would grow 7 or 8 feet tall and would be as big around at the base as a mans thumb and taper down to almost a whip when stripped of all their leaves. We would arm ourselves with a good weed and try to smack the bumble bees as they came out of the log. Most of the time we would win because they were very big and slow at flying not fast like a honey bee, they were as big as your thumb. Well all went well until my cousin Butch had one approaching him straight as his eyes, as Butch was trying to whip it with his weed stick literately fanning the air ,but the bee got through and landed a big sting smack between his eyes which almost shut off his eye sight. Well that pretty well done for that kind of fun the bees finally won. Uncle Ran

The Ultimate Photo Trip Chapter II

February 5th, 2015

The Ultimate Photo Trip Chapter II

As we left Oregon and started down the coast toward Sacramento, my wife said instead of going on down the coast to the big red wood trees lets go inland and go to Mt. Shasta, trees are just trees but the mountains are special. I had never heard much about Mt. Shasta although it's almost as tall as Mt. Rainier at 14,000 + feet, it's very photogenic because it stands almost alone rising above the terrain all around. We finally located for the night in a little town called "Weed" . The next morning I got up as usual before daylight ,but Kay she was to tired to go with me, so I headed out alone to explore the area around the mountain. The Town of Mt. Shasta lies at the foot of the mountain and along Lake Siskiyou make for some great photography. Sell Art OnlineThis area is soon to be discovered,as it is listed as one of the ten top places to visit in 2015.

The Ultimate Photo trip

February 5th, 2015

The Ultimate Photo trip

After over ten years of planning a trip out west it has finally come to fruition. My wife Kay and I had started to take this vacation/photo trip over ten years ago and every year it had to be postponed . As I usually do, I started planning the trip and where all we we go and what we could photograph.
We started in Cincinnati Ohio and drove 9663 miles over a 34 day trip, taking over 10,000 photos along the way. Thank God we didn't use film,but all digital. I hate to think how much it would have cost to have had to buy all that film and processing.
I used my Nikon D2X and Nikon D7100, Kay used her Nikon D300 and D100, we have a variety of lens ranging from a wide angle of 12mm to a Nikon VR 300mm f/2.8 for long range and wildlife.

One of the first places we wanted to capture was the Grand Tetons at Oxbow Bend on the Eastern side of the Tetons and timed our leaving to arrive there for a couple of days to catch the August Super Moon. The moon was of course setting over the mountains and not rising so we had to get up quite early to be there to catch the moon as the sun was rising.Photography Prints We had to stay at a little town about 60 miles East of the Jackson Hole Wyoming, which was a real cowboy town from the old west era. We captured many shots of the Tetons from several locations up and down the Snake River as it winds in front of the Tetons. The Oxbow Bend was a favorite.
After we left Mt Moran and the Snake River there at the Tetons we headed north to Yellowstone Park and all the grandieur this wonderful park has to offer. The wildlife there is incredible, most notable is the herds of Bison. Sell Art Online The Yellowstone Falls are a photographers dream ,so easy to get to and magnificent to view from many vantage points. I just wish we had scheduled more time for this great park.

The Pheasant Flush

January 16th, 2015




The Pheasant Flush
It was early in the morning, in the fall of 1957, Dad walked into our bedroom and said boys lets go get us a pheasant. We were always ready to grab our guns and head out to go hunting. We quickly got dressed and went on into the kitchen where Mom was fixing the usual Saturday morning breakfast, a pan of 24 biscuits with gravy, bacon and eggs. We would have biscuits for lunch and most times supper too, that way she would have to bake only once per day.
Dad said you boys hook up the tractor and wagon and we’ll will go up on the hill to that patch of corn and shuck us a load of corn before we come back for lunch.
I was a lean 13 years old and brother Dane was going on seventeen and already gallivanting around doing things most couldn’t even think about. He could whip a bull dog with buzz saws for paws and wouldn’t hesitate to do it. It seems he got connected up with a group of guys up at the Clinton air Base in Wilmington who had their own Levi jackets printed up with their names on them and they thought they were tough. Dad didn’t take to it very well, but that’s another story.
It took a while to get up to the top of this big hill as we had to follow the creek for a ways to another branch off to the left and then start climbing up the hill in order to travers the country with a tractor and wagon. I always hated to have to go after the cows at milking time because that’s where they would always be. I remember at one time we had this beautiful collie dog and when I would get home from school he would have the cows in the barn lot waiting for me. I guess that’s why I loved the movie about OLE YELLER; he was the best daggum dog in the world.
As we pulled up to the corn patch I could just feel the pheasants get ready to jump out and fly away, but nothing moved. We climbed down off the tractor and walked over to the patch and grabbed a couple of stalks of corn to twist them together so we could lean our shotguns up against them like a tripod. That would keep the guns up off the ground and away from our flying ears of corn hitting the wagon, which was why we couldn’t load them in the wagon. About that time a big ole cock rooster flew up out from under our guns, knocking our guns down and scaring me over into the next farmers field. Sell Art Online
After we got ourselves composed again we started shucking corn and proceeded to fill the wagon. If you have never had a pheasant fly up out from under your feet cackling and flapping those wings , well you just can’t seem to ever get ready for it. They most always want to run or just plain hide like this one, only he waited until we walked away and then he flew the coop.
I thought at that time there wasn’t anything as good as roast pheasant and we had it often, but times and things changed and the pheasant population of the fifty’s was gone for many years,
it’s just now starting to come back . But the big problem now is there are no longer any small farms with small patches of corn with weeds growing up around the corn stalks for the birds to hide in. We have become too adept at farming and spreading insecticides and such cleaning out even the fence rows. I guess that’s why when I see a pretty little old farm stead like this one I stop and starting shooting with my camera. I took so many pictures of this little farm that the farmer came out to see what I was doing, we had a good talk and I left. I love the country and old barns.
Uncle Ran

 

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